The Holocaust as a Challenge

Yad Vashem Studies, Volume XV

Bill Bruinooge

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The Holocaust as a Challenge to Belief

The objective historical study of the Holocaust is indispensable. Yet, because the magnitude of its evil challenges basic human faith, its moral, religious, and theological implications must be grappled with. On the one hand, Martin Buber, as many victims did, challenges God’s silence, but insists that for the truly religious He continues to exist. Buber insists that faith cannot be altered by occurrences within the lives of people. Rabbi Richard Rubinstein, on the other hand, reacting to the Final Solution, denies the existence of God. According to Eliezer Berkovitz, the coming of Christ is believed by Christians to be for the salvation of all humankind. If such salvation is not achieved, the only alternative is rejection of the Christian God. James Roth writes, “History itself is God’s indictment.” Eva Fleischner raises the question of the Church’s complicity in the Holocaust. Alice and Arthur Roy Eckardt believe that the desire to convert Jews to Christianity is another attempt at the Final Solution. Irving Greenberg emphasizes that prevention of evil on the scale of the Holocaust is of primary importance.

Products specifications
ISSN 0084-3296
Year 1983
Catalog No. 198307
No. of Pages 8 pp.
Format Electronic article in Yad Vashem Studies, Volume XV, pp. 193-200, Edited by Livia Rothkirchen
Publisher Yad Vashem