IN SPITE OF IT ALL: Julius Paltiel - A Norwegian Jew in Auschwitz

Vera Komissar

 

A child’s cry pierces the stillness. The wail breaks the dismal silence that fell when the doors were locked. It’s as if the child’s tears give us all permission to let out our despair. Julius Paltiel grew up in Trondheim, Norway, where he lived with his mother and his brother. Like all the Jews of Norway, their lives changed forever when the Nazis came to power in April 1940. His arrest at the age of eighteen in 1942 marked the beginning of a journey of inconceivable horror and brutality in the Nazi concentration camps. Initially incarcerated in Falstad, a Nazi concentration camp in his native Norway, Julius Paltiel was then deported to Germany by sea in February 1943 before boarding a train to Auschwitz. He was selected for forced labor to work for IG Farben in Auschwitz III–Monowitz. In January 1945, he was sent on a death march to Buchenwald where he was liberated by U.S. forces on April 11, 1945. Julius Paltiel is one of the few Norwegian Jews who survived and returned from Auschwitz and one of the Jewish survivors who testified in the war crime trials against the Nazi perpetrators in Norway. He dedicated his life to the fight against antisemitism to ensure that such horrors would never happen again. As one of only a handful of Holocaust testimonies from Norway, In Spite of It All sheds light on Julius Paltiel’s personal ordeal to survive the Holocaust as well as on the Jewish persecution and murder of Norway’s Jewish community. This tale of survival also serves as a warning of the atrocities that are possible at the hands of ordinary human beings.

NIS 104.00
Products specifications
Translator From the Norwegian: Cheska Komissar
ISBN 978-965-308-674-6
No. of Pages 154
Year 2022
Size 23.5X15.5
Format Hard Cover
Publisher Yad Vashem
Products specifications
Translator From the Norwegian: Cheska Komissar
ISBN 978-965-308-674-6
No. of Pages 154
Year 2022
Size 23.5X15.5
Format Hard Cover
Publisher Yad Vashem
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