Europe in the Eyes of Survivors of the Holocaust

Editors: Zeev Mankowitz, David Weinberg, Sharon Kangisser Cohen

 

In what sense was the European heritage responsible for Jewish cultural and intellectual development? How could one describe the events of the Holocaust? Was there a future for Jews in a reconstructed Europe? A group of scholars suggests a more nuanced view by examining the perspectives of ten survivors – philosophers, activists, and memoirists – whose attitudes towards the European past were characterized by conflicting feelings of alienation and attraction.

NIS 169.00
NIS 45.00
Products specifications
Year 2014
ISBN 978-965-308-465-0
Catalog No. 860
No. of Pages 256 pp.
Size 16X23 cm.
Format Hard Cover
Publisher Yad Vashem
Translator
סעיף תקציבי מאגד 000189
קוד מחלקה 41
קוד אגף 17
קוד תת פעילות אלמוג 086
קוד פעילות אלמוג 112
חשבון הכנסות 71200101
Products specifications
Year 2014
ISBN 978-965-308-465-0
Catalog No. 860
No. of Pages 256 pp.
Size 16X23 cm.
Format Hard Cover
Publisher Yad Vashem
Translator
סעיף תקציבי מאגד 000189
קוד מחלקה 41
קוד אגף 17
קוד תת פעילות אלמוג 086
קוד פעילות אלמוג 112
חשבון הכנסות 71200101
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Escaping Hell in Treblinka includes two remarkable documents written by two survivors of that hellish darkness while the authors were still in hiding, unsure if they would succeed in evading the Nazis. Israel Cymlich’s memoir provides a rare insight into the Treblinka I forced labor camp’s brutal daily life, as well as the regular contact and human traffic between the two Treblinka camps. Srul escaped in April 1943, just before he was due to be transferred to the Treblinka II extermination camp. Oskar Strawczynski’s memoir is one of the earliest written eyewitness accounts of the August 1943 uprising in Treblinka. He tells of Jewish camp officials’ cruel treatment of their fellow Jewish prisoners; the viciousness of the German staff; preparations for the uprising, and life after the mass escape from the camp. Both men owed their survival to their own daring and initiative as well as to the assistance they received from a variety of people, including Polish rescuers.

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