After the Darkness?

Holocaust Survivors’ Emotional, Psychological, and Social Journeys in the Early Postwar Period

Editors: Constance Pâris de Bollardière and Sharon Kangisser Cohen

 

His reaction to my cautious questions about his parents, his brothers and sisters, his experiences in the concentration camp was characteristic. His only response was to let his head drop onto his chest. He remained sitting in this posture in silence for some time. It must be said here without pathos or literary embellishment that it is only now that he has been returned to normal life that this child feels the pain and torment of everything he has seen and experienced.

Hans Keilson

NIS 169.00

Emerging from the horror and ruins of the Holocaust, survivors were confronted with many challenges, both physical and psychological. The loss of their loved ones, the destruction of their world, and prolonged exposure to violence and suffering would leave an indelible mark. This volume examines how individuals—physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychoanalysts, educators, social workers, or activists and organizations understood, evaluated, and responded to the war’s emotional impact on Holocaust survivors. What kinds of programs or support networks did they develop and offer? How did the survivors themselves face their emotional and psychological wounds and needs?

After the Darkness? Holocaust Survivors’ Emotional, Psychological, and Social Journeys in the Early Postwar Period brings together international scholars from different disciplines to address these questions. Their important work in this burgeoning field documents and traces several case studies on the theories, observations, and practices of organizations and individuals who strove tirelessly to provide a way forward for survivors in the aftermath of the war.

Emerging from the horror and ruins of the Holocaust, survivors were confronted with many challenges, both physical and psychological. The loss of their loved ones, the destruction of their world, and prolonged exposure to violence and suffering would leave an indelible mark. This volume examines how individuals—physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychoanalysts, educators, social workers, or activists and organizations understood, evaluated, and responded to the war’s emotional impact on Holocaust survivors. What kinds of programs or support networks did they develop and offer? How did the survivors themselves face their emotional and psychological wounds and needs?

After the Darkness? Holocaust Survivors’ Emotional, Psychological, and Social Journeys in the Early Postwar Period brings together international scholars from different disciplines to address these questions. Their important work in this burgeoning field documents and traces several case studies on the theories, observations, and practices of organizations and individuals who strove tirelessly to provide a way forward for survivors in the aftermath of the war.

מפרט המוצר
Size 16X23 cm.
Format Hard Cover
כריכה קשה
ISBN 978-965-308-685-2
Year 2023
No. of Pages 280
Publisher Yad Vashem In association with the American University of Paris
גולשים שקנו מוצר זה קנו גם

Through Our Eyes - Children Witness the Holocaust

Ages 12-14 Language: English

 

Book

NIS 78.00

Yad Vashem Studies: Volume 51 [1]

Edited by Sharon Kangisser Cohen

 

Table of Contents: • Introduction • Michael Robert Marrus (1941-2022)—In Memoriam (Doris Bergen) • The Polish Underground State and the Financing of Help for the Jews: An Attempt at a New Approach (Dariusz Libionka) • News from Auschwitz: The International Underground’s Secret Reports and the Jewish Holocaust (Tom Navon) • Bandera, Genocide, and Justice: Was Stepan Bandera Responsible for Crimes Committed by the OUN and the UPA? (Grzegorz Rossoliński-Liebe) • Politics of Holocaust Memory in Communist and Post-Communist Romania: On Survivor Matei Gall’s Multiple Life Stories (Ștefan Cristian Ionescu and Dana Mihăilescu)

NIS 78.00

Written in a Barn: The Diary of a Young Woman from Vilna

Ruth Leimenzon Engles| Edited by Ben-Tsiyon Klibansky

 

At last, I have gotten a notebook in which to write. I have a pencil. I will try. Maybe it will make it easier to push through the days. It’s hard for me. As soon as dawn breaks, my first thought is: how does one endure until the end of the day.
Ruth Leimenzon Engles, May 15, 1944

A few days after the Germans occupied Vilna at the end of June 1941, Ruth Leimenzon’s husband was seized by local collaborators and was never seen again. Ruth, the sole survivor of her murdered family, managed to survive two years in the ghetto using her intelligence and common sense, helped by luck and perhaps miracles. Just two days before the ghetto’s liquidation in September 1943, Ruth escaped with the help of a Christian woman, her former boss’ wife, and found a hiding place in a barn on a farm 20 kilometers from Vilna, where she hid for nearly a year. During the last two months in the barn, Ruth wrote a diary in Yiddish describing her three-year ordeal.

NIS 104.00
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