It Happened ON OUR PLANET

Moral Dilemmas among Jews in the Reality of the Holocaust

By Yitzhak Arad

 

It Happened on Our Planet offers a brutally honest insight into the horrifying decisions that the Jews had to make and the unbearable situations in which the Jews found themselves during this time. The publication of this important work will present generations to come with a better understanding of the complex reality of the Holocaust.

 

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In confronting the moral problems raised in this research, I find myself emotionally overwhelmed by them…. I feel as if I am present in the events described in this research, and I incessantly ask myself: What would I have done? How would I have behaved? How would I have responded to that reality?

Yitzhak (Tolka) Arad

As a former partisan, Holocaust survivor, brigadier general in the Israel Defense Forces, historian, and chairman of Yad Vashem, Yitzhak (Tolka) Arad contributed much important historical research and insight about the Holocaust during his long life. In this thought-provoking final work, Arad presents the impossible moral dilemmas experienced by the Jews in the reality of the Holocaust.

Through excerpts from diaries, memoirs, archival material, and research works, Arad addresses some of the most difficult moral questions among Jews from this time. How did the different Judenräte respond when they were ordered to carry out the horrific orders of the Nazis? Is it justified to risk the lives of others in order to save oneself in the cruelty of the concentration camps? To whom should one give medicine in the case of insufficient medical supplies? Should the underground organizations risk the lives of the masses to fight the enemy? Arad examines these moral issues and others from an unquestionably unique perspective as an eyewitness to the Holocaust, and he includes his own moral dilemmas both in the ghetto and during his time as a partisan.

It Happened on Our Planet offers a brutally honest insight into the horrifying decisions that the Jews had to make and the unbearable situations in which the Jews found themselves during this time. The publication of this important work will present generations to come with a better understanding of the complex reality of the Holocaust.

 

In confronting the moral problems raised in this research, I find myself emotionally overwhelmed by them…. I feel as if I am present in the events described in this research, and I incessantly ask myself: What would I have done? How would I have behaved? How would I have responded to that reality?

Yitzhak (Tolka) Arad

As a former partisan, Holocaust survivor, brigadier general in the Israel Defense Forces, historian, and chairman of Yad Vashem, Yitzhak (Tolka) Arad contributed much important historical research and insight about the Holocaust during his long life. In this thought-provoking final work, Arad presents the impossible moral dilemmas experienced by the Jews in the reality of the Holocaust.

Through excerpts from diaries, memoirs, archival material, and research works, Arad addresses some of the most difficult moral questions among Jews from this time. How did the different Judenräte respond when they were ordered to carry out the horrific orders of the Nazis? Is it justified to risk the lives of others in order to save oneself in the cruelty of the concentration camps? To whom should one give medicine in the case of insufficient medical supplies? Should the underground organizations risk the lives of the masses to fight the enemy? Arad examines these moral issues and others from an unquestionably unique perspective as an eyewitness to the Holocaust, and he includes his own moral dilemmas both in the ghetto and during his time as a partisan.

It Happened on Our Planet offers a brutally honest insight into the horrifying decisions that the Jews had to make and the unbearable situations in which the Jews found themselves during this time. The publication of this important work will present generations to come with a better understanding of the complex reality of the Holocaust.

 

מפרט המוצר
Year 2023
ISBN 978-965-308-688-3
Catalog No. 446
No. of Pages 128 pp.
No. of Pages 382 pp.
Size 17X24 cm.
Format Hard Cover
Publisher Yad Vashem
Translator Dan Gillon
תגיות מוצר
גולשים שקנו מוצר זה קנו גם

Written in a Barn: The Diary of a Young Woman from Vilna

Ruth Leimenzon Engles| Edited by Ben-Tsiyon Klibansky

 

At last, I have gotten a notebook in which to write. I have a pencil. I will try. Maybe it will make it easier to push through the days. It’s hard for me. As soon as dawn breaks, my first thought is: how does one endure until the end of the day.
Ruth Leimenzon Engles, May 15, 1944

A few days after the Germans occupied Vilna at the end of June 1941, Ruth Leimenzon’s husband was seized by local collaborators and was never seen again. Ruth, the sole survivor of her murdered family, managed to survive two years in the ghetto using her intelligence and common sense, helped by luck and perhaps miracles. Just two days before the ghetto’s liquidation in September 1943, Ruth escaped with the help of a Christian woman, her former boss’ wife, and found a hiding place in a barn on a farm 20 kilometers from Vilna, where she hid for nearly a year. During the last two months in the barn, Ruth wrote a diary in Yiddish describing her three-year ordeal.

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Diary From Hell in Transnistria 1942–1944

Lipman Kunstadt | Edited by Sarah Rosen and Dalia Ofer

 

I decided to stop writing the diary and to destroy the pages… I eventually overcame the despair and listened to the counterargument…a miracle may occur and your fragmentary writings will be the only remaining memory of Transnistria. (Lipman Kunstadt, August 26, 1942)

Diary from Hell in Transnistria is a painfully vivid and intricate account of life in the Dzhurin ghetto in Transnistria, written by Lipman Kunstadt, who was deported there from Radauţi, Romania, with his wife, his children, his mother, and his sister on October 14, 1941. Kunstadt, who was well-educated and a journalist, was appointed secretary of the Jewish council in the Dzhurin ghetto, where he had access to a great deal of information about its inner workings. He began writing his diary in Yiddish on April 11, 1942, at great risk, sparing no criticism against the ghetto leadership. 

$37.63

IN SPITE OF IT ALL: Julius Paltiel - A Norwegian Jew in Auschwitz

Vera Komissar

 

A child’s cry pierces the stillness. The wail breaks the dismal silence that fell when the doors were locked. It’s as if the child’s tears give us all permission to let out our despair. Julius Paltiel grew up in Trondheim, Norway, where he lived with his mother and his brother. Like all the Jews of Norway, their lives changed forever when the Nazis came to power in April 1940. His arrest at the age of eighteen in 1942 marked the beginning of a journey of inconceivable horror and brutality in the Nazi concentration camps. Initially incarcerated in Falstad, a Nazi concentration camp in his native Norway, Julius Paltiel was then deported to Germany by sea in February 1943 before boarding a train to Auschwitz. He was selected for forced labor to work for IG Farben in Auschwitz III–Monowitz. In January 1945, he was sent on a death march to Buchenwald where he was liberated by U.S. forces on April 11, 1945. Julius Paltiel is one of the few Norwegian Jews who survived and returned from Auschwitz and one of the Jewish survivors who testified in the war crime trials against the Nazi perpetrators in Norway. He dedicated his life to the fight against antisemitism to ensure that such horrors would never happen again. As one of only a handful of Holocaust testimonies from Norway, In Spite of It All sheds light on Julius Paltiel’s personal ordeal to survive the Holocaust as well as on the Jewish persecution and murder of Norway’s Jewish community. This tale of survival also serves as a warning of the atrocities that are possible at the hands of ordinary human beings.

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Entanglements of War: Social Networks during the Holocaust

Edited by: Eliyana R. Adler and Natalia Aleksiun

 

The Nazi persecution and murder of the Jews of Europe led to the atomization of the social relationships of the victims. Families were ripped apart. Entire communities were ghettoized and isolated from the outside world. The forced removal of the Jews from the midst of the non-Jewish population facilitated the crimes committed against them, significantly limited the assistance they could rely on, and restricted the number of witnesses to their persecution and murder. However, despite the devastation, disruption, and loss brought by the Holocaust, prewar patterns and lationships continued to shape decisions and actions by Jews and non-Jews both during and after the war. Even in extremis, they often relied on established networks of support that had been forged in very different circumstances. Jewish victims as well as bystanders and perpetrators relied on the already familiar cohort of relatives, neighbors, peers, and colleagues to support and assist them during this time. Just as these networks brought people with various backgrounds together, Entanglements of War compiles a broad range of interdisciplinary perspectives to reveal invaluable findings about the relationships, choices, and actions that shaped these complex connections, and their impact on Jewish lives during the Holocaust and its immediate aftermath.

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